Project Overview

A mere 2 percent of Haiti’s original forest still exists. But what remains harbors a staggering diversity of unique and Threatened species. Global Wildlife Conservation is working with local NGO Société Audubon Haiti (SAH) to avoid an ecological collapse through the creation of the first-ever network of private nature reserves in the country, starting with the acquisition and management of 637 acres on Morne Grand Bois to safeguard more than 68 vertebrate species including the Hispaniolan Trogon and Yellow Cave Frog.

With 15 Threatened frog species found nowhere else in the world, the Massif de la Hotte in southwest Haiti is the number one priority site in the country. A slew of recent research expeditions have proved this to be an underestimate with the discovery of new species and rediscovery of others that haven’t been seen in decades, such as the Tiburon Stream Frog, which reappeared after four decades without trace. But the frogs and the forests they call home are perilously close to being wiped out. To prevent this, we’re helping bring the conservation of the last remaining tracts of unprotected forest under the stewardship of SAH.

Project Objectives

Unidentified species of anole lizard from Tete Boeuf in the Massif de la Hotte. (Photo by Robin Moore)

Unidentified species of anole lizard from Tete Boeuf in the Massif de la Hotte. (Photo by Robin Moore)

Legal purchase of the lands that comprise the Grand Bois forest. Morne Grand Bois is an isolated mountain rising to 1,248 meters above sea level in the Massif de la Hotte. It is the second highest mountain in all of the west Tiburon Peninsula, and stands out because it has a large area above 1,000 meters and contains an unusually large amount of original forest with at least one spring. The forest here provides critical habitat for numerous animals found nowhere else in the world.

Implement a management plan for forest management. With partners we have developed a management plan for implementation, including invasive species protocol and boundary and trail improvement. The plan outlines the goals, strategies and actions required to guide forest management.

Expand the network to additional sites. Since 2005, we have been working with local and international partners to identify the highest priority sites for conservation in Haiti. Through repeated scientific expeditions, we’ve found new and rediscovered species and identified the 11 hotspots in Haiti, in addition to Grand Bois, that we’d like to develop plans to protect.

Quick Facts

Target Species

More than 68 vertebrate species including the Hispaniolan Trogon and Yellow Cave Frog

Partners

Société Audubon Haiti

Region

Morne Grand Bois, an isolated mountain rising to 1,248 meters above sea level in the Massif de la Hotte

Additional GWC Projects in the Caribbean