Africa



Protecting species such as charismatic gorillas in the Congo to tiny jewel-like frogs in Madagascar to keep Africa brimming with biodiversity.

Africa



Protecting species such as charismatic gorillas in the Congo to tiny jewel-like frogs in Madagascar to keep Africa brimming with biodiversity.

Rhinos. Lions. Leopards. Giraffes. The stuff of children’s picture books, roaming free on vast plains under expansive sapphire skies. Vast swathes of lowland rainforest aloud with the chatter of chimpanzees. The stillness of an ethereal cloud forest broken by the crashing of branches, betraying the close presence of a magnificent gorilla. Peaks and ridges on an unimaginable scale bursting with life, much of it still waiting to be discovered. And then there is Madagascar, the world’s fourth largest island home to lemurs, chameleons and beautiful frogs, like living jewels.

Africa, the cradle of humankind, represents a final frontier for conservation on many fronts. With the many challenges posed by preserving some of these incredible and irreplaceable species, comes immense opportunity. GWC is working with partners throughout this vast continent to protect some of the most at-risk species in some of the most threatened ecosystems for future generations. We are protecting critical habitats, exploring uncharted regions, and building local capacity for sustainable conservation. Areas of special focus are the rainforests of West, Central and East Africa and Madagascar.

Conservation Impact


By the Numbers

5

The number of African countries GWC is working in to help save species.”

In 2012, the Kihansi Spray Toad, a unique species of toad from the Udzungwa Mountains of Tanzania, was returned into the wild by GWC and partners, including the Government of Tanzania, the University of Dar es Salaam, the Wildlife Conservation Society, and the Toledo Zoo, among others. This is the first time in history that an amphibian species has been Extinct in the Wild and subsequently reintroduced into its native habitat, marking a huge conservation success both for Tanzania and the planet.

Conservation Impact


In 2012, the Kihansi Spray Toad, a unique species of toad from the Udzungwa Mountains of Tanzania, was returned into the wild by GWC and partners, including the Government of Tanzania, the University of Dar es Salaam, the Wildlife Conservation Society, and the Toledo Zoo, among others. This is the first time in history that an amphibian species has been Extinct in the Wild and subsequently reintroduced into its native habitat, marking a huge conservation success both for Tanzania and the planet.

By the Numbers

5

The number of African countries GWC is working in to help save species.”

By the Numbers

5

The number of African countries GWC is working in to help save species.”

Africa Projects