Dark muntjac still

GWC associate conservation scientist captures rare footage of elusive deer species from Laos

February 13, 2015

The common names of the species that likely inhabit the remote Xe Sap National Protected Area in Southern Laos sound almost mythical: Chinese Serow, Annamite-Striped Rabbit, Saola, Annamite dark muntjac. These species’ elusive nature also lends credence to their folkloric status. GWC Associate Conservation Scientist Andrew Tilker set out to capture photographic evidence of the Read more

Photo by Robin Moore, Global Wildlife Conservation

A Q&A with GWC Chief Scientist & CEO Wes Sechrest on new anti-poaching endowment

January 19, 2015

GWC’s Walter Steven Sechrest Endowment for Wildlife Protection protects endangered wildlife through anti-poaching efforts and by supporting wildlife rangers at nature reserves around the globe. We recently sat down with GWC Chief Scientist and CEO Wes Sechrest to learn about GWC’s role in anti-poaching efforts and the new endowment, established in honor of Wes’s father, Lieutenant Colonel Read more

The trees are the foundation of the forest, providing the structure, shelter, nesting sites, and food for all the inhabitants. (Photo by Liz Condo)

Part IV: Reflection

November 25, 2014

Reflections: November 25, 2014 By Leeanne Alonso The forests of the Upper Berbice region of eastern Guyana are truly amazing. It was a privilege to be able to study these forests, the most pristine, undisturbed forests that most of the survey team have ever encountered in Guyana, or within the entire neotropics. The forests at Read more

Meshach set out on a mission to see up close and for the first time a hummingbird called the crimson topaz. (Photo by Andrew Snyder)

Part III: Berbice White Sands Camp

October 7, 2014

At the end of September 2014, a team of intrepid researchers set out into the wilds of eastern Guyana on the northern coast of South America, to track down and document the region’s abundant wildlife, ranging from the small invertebrate (bullet ants) to larger mammals (puma). The forests of south-central Guyana are among the least Read more

Sept 25-Paraponera ant_Andrew Snyder

Part II: Berbice River Camp

October 7, 2014

At the end of September 2014, a team of intrepid researchers set out into the wilds of eastern Guyana on the northern coast of South America, to track down and document the region’s abundant wildlife, ranging from the small invertebrate (bullet ants) to larger mammals (puma). The forests of south-central Guyana are among the least Read more

Isaac Johnson (Uncle Johnno) keys out plants with the field guide. (Photo by Liz Condo)

Part I: Meet the team

October 6, 2014

A comprehensive survey of all of the creatures, big and small, in a region requires a scientific team of varied backgrounds. The Berbice survey team drew on the talents of ornithologists, herpetologists, mammalogists, myrmecologists, among others, and relied on the expertise of both international and local researchers. GWC’s Director of Global Biodiversity Exploration Dr. Leeanne Read more

forest canopy

Rainforest Haiku by Talented 5th Grade Students

May 13, 2014

Andrew Beal’s fifth grade class explored the causes and effects of deforestation, and then they took steps to engage others in the fight to protect forests. Among other outcomes, the students’ efforts resulted in raising $385 for GWC’s Acre for Nature Program. This is the second year the students have researched deforestation and made a donation Read more

Photo credit needed3

Surveying Papua New Guinea – One of the Last Great Wildernesses Part 2

October 24, 2012

The Star Mountains, located in southwest Papua New Guinea, are rich in botanical species: during February and March this year, the intrepid research team identified around 700 plant varieties, of which 28 were new species, including rhododendrons, myrtles and orchids (there are more species of orchid in New Guinea than any other region). There were Read more

Bulbophyllum scaphosepalum

Surveying Papua New Guinea – One of the Last Great Wildernesses Part 1

October 17, 2012

Shrouded in mist and drenched by regular rains, the tropical montane forests of Papua New Guinea’s remote western interior offer an unforgiving domain. Concealed by the thick, entangled undergrowth, a pioneering biological survey along the Hindenburg Wall – possibly one of the most biodiverse regions on Earth – has revealed dozens of species new to Read more